At what size does a wave become dangerous?

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Anonymous
Minus other elements (boards, rocks, ect.), at what size factor does a wave become dangerous? Not necessarily deadly but, harmful if swallowed.  

16 Jan 2003 00:36
Anonymous
Hey man, it takes only a teaspoon of water to choke.  

16 Jan 2003 00:37
Anonymous
[quote=Mad Mex]Hey man, it takes only a teaspoon of water to choke.[/quote]

I guess I wasn't really concerned with drowning part but, good point. I would rather be able to calculate the the energy behind the motion against my own skill level and I can't be sure of what to expect in something bigger than what I am use to which, aint much.  

16 Jan 2003 00:37
Anonymous
Hollow beachbreak waves like HB generally break harder than often mushier pointbreaks...point being that the type of wave matters more than size. I'll let the experts take over now... :wink:  

16 Jan 2003 00:38
Anonymous
i only seem to get hit by my board in smaller surf - so i say the smaller the more dangerous. surf drownings seem to mostly occur in conjunction with head injuries by board or reef.  

16 Jan 2003 00:40
Anonymous
your question is highly subjective.The easiest, and universal, way to answer would be: a wave becomes dangerous when and only when you let your fear of possible dangers affect your judgement.A wave that woul be dangerous to me, most likely would'nt be seen as dangerous through the eyes of gerry lopez, or laird.All waves are inherintely dangerous, but whether or not that danger materializes is all dependent upon your psyche.Beauty is all in the eye of the beholder as is fear and danger.  

16 Jan 2003 00:40
Anonymous
What do you mean by "dangerous"? If you mean possible drowning just by the force of the wave keeping you underwater, then probably 20+ feet.  

16 Jan 2003 00:41
Anonymous
[quote=JohnnylikesWater]What do you mean by "dangerous"? If you mean possible drowning just by the force of the wave keeping you underwater, then probably 20+ feet.[/quote]

Thats what I was wondering. Thanks :)  

16 Jan 2003 00:42
Anonymous
All waves of any size are inherently dangerous. There is no size threshold forwhat constitutes a dangerous wave. Some 3 ft waves are more dangerous than some 10 ft waves.

But you being a surfer already knew that, right?  

16 Jan 2003 00:43
Anonymous
How in god's name could a 3 foot wave be dangerous at all, MUD?  

16 Jan 2003 00:44
Anonymous
I cannot see myself getting hurt badly on a three foot wave unless I fall the wrong way. I am not talking about all the other factors... just the wave itself.  

16 Jan 2003 00:44
Anonymous
3 foot waves breaking one second apart on a very flat sandy beach with a shallow dip expanding the breaker zone by a factor of 10, many unmapped holes pock marking the entire system, strong unpredictable currents going in a multitude of directions. Gusty crosswinds.

More dangerous than a single outer reef 10 foot wave if you ask me.  

16 Jan 2003 00:46
Anonymous
About 2 years ago, Surfer Mag, had an article on injuries and surf size. Most of the bad injuries were in small surf. In small surf, we simply let our guard down.....not a good idea. Mother Nature can kick our butt at anytime.  

16 Jan 2003 00:47
Anonymous
i've split my coconut wide open on a 3 ft hollow ass day at seal beach, i've got a scar 2 inches long on my right wrist from a 4 ft almost shore pound wave at 17th st h.b. i've got the shit scared out of me at (believe or not) double over head frieght train el segundo jetty's (im not kidding on the size or place either) and i've had my ass handed to me at 5 ft pipe.

my point is : a wear battle scars from nothing waves, but i think ive feared most on heavy thick waves that can drag you around and around. and around and so on and so on....  

16 Jan 2003 00:49
Anonymous
i think that waves really arent that dangerous. unless your talking 15 feet plus.. it really is just about your self. if you start panicking when a 3 foot set wave comes through and you get held under and your still panicking, u will lose a lot of oxygen quickly. i think the best strategy is to just relax and let the wave do its thing. as people have said before, it also has to do with the spot. pipline as aposed to la jolla shores.  

16 Jan 2003 00:50

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